MFTV #14 CONTENTS (SOLD OUT!):

DELIVER US TO EVIL: Cinematographers of Horror's Golden Age Part IV by Steve Kronenberg. The concluding portion of Steve's article on Golden Age cinematographers focuses on John J. Mescall, who photographed The Black Cat (1934) and Bride of Frankenstein (1935), and on George Robinson, Universal's most prolific photographer, who lensed the Spanish-language Dracula (1931), Dracula's Daughter (1936), The Invisible Ray (1936), and Son of Frankenstein (1939).

JACK PIERCE INTERVIEWED: Universal's Resident Makeup Genius Remembers the Making of the Classic Movie Monsters in a Long-lost 1962 Interview! by Bob Burns as told to Tom Weaver. Bob provides us with a wonderful transcript of Wayne Thomas' live September 17, 1962, KHJ-TV Million Dollar Movie interview with Jack P. Pierce. Bob, who was present (backstage) at the interview, asked a friend to stay home that night and audiotape it from TV for him, which he did, using one of the old reel-to-reel tape recorders. "I still have that original tape. Owning what might be the only existing tape of a Jack Pierce interview means a lot to me now."

KARLOFF AND LORRE: On the HY GARDNER SHOW (Early 1963) by Richard Scrivani. In the early winter months of 1963, coinciding with AIP's release of Roger Corman's The Raven, two of its stars, Boris Karloff and Peter Lorre, made the rounds of radio and television talk shows to promote the film. This article features a transcription of what remains on tape of Hy Gardner's 1963 TV show, during which Karloff and Lorre shared a relaxed hour and not only discussed the release of The Raven but also gave the audience glimpses of their acting careers and private lives.

LON CHANEY, JR. ON HERE'S HOLLYWOOD! by Tom Weaver. Tom provides us with a transcript of a rare June 1962 TV interview with Lon Chaney, Jr., at his home, as seen on the Jack Linkletter series Here's Hollywood. Also featured are remembrances of the star from Janet Ann Gallow and Karolyn Grimes, who worked with Chaney as children in The Ghost of Frankenstein (1942) and Albuquerque (1948), respectively.

FORGOTTEN UNIVERSALS OF THE 1940s: Some of the Studio's Silver Age Thrillers Remain Unavailable on Home Video by Mark Clark. Why have some of Universal's Silver Age thrillers slipped through the cracks, and will they ever see the "video" light of day? Only Universal knows for sure. Until then, Mark examines Universal films from the 1940s, such as Horror Island, Flesh and Fantasy, Murder in the Blue Room, Mad Doctor of Market Street, The Spider Woman Strikes Back, and The Cat Creeps, which have yet to be released on home video.

All this, plus editorial comments, letters, film reviews, book reviews, and tons of photos. Published Spring 2002.

MFTV #15 CONTENTS (SOLD OUT!):

FIRST LOOK! Kronenberg & Weaver's Universal Horrors II by Steve Kronenberg. Steve and Tom give us a sneak peek at their upcoming book from McFarland & Company on Universal's horror and science fiction film output of the 1950s.

END OF AN EXPLOITATION ERA by Tom Weaver. Gail Cohen bids farewell to her late, great uncle, fright film legend Herman Cohen, as she shares many great remembrances and stories about her uncle.

UNIVERSAL'S RETURN TO GLORY, DOUBLE-FEATURE STYLE by Bryan Senn. Bryan looks at the 1943 Universal pairing of Son of Dracula with a macabre little thriller entitled The Mad Ghoul to create one of the studio's sharpest double bills of the decade.

POST MORTEM by Tom Weaver. Tom talks to director Ted Post about his 1948 production of Dracula at the Norwich Summer Theatre, which featured the 65-year-old Bela Lugosi as the Count.

CLIFFHANGING HORRORS CHAPTER ONE by Todd M. Gault. In the first installment of his three-part article, entitled "Dick Tracy vs. Dracula," Todd explores the serials of the 1930s, whose themes include a touch of horror and sci-fi.

All this, plus editorial comments, letters, film reviews, book reviews, and tons of photos. Published Spring 2003.

MFTV #16 CONTENTS (SOLD OUT!):

BEST SUPPORTING PLAYERS OF THE 1930s AND '40s by Steven Thornton. While all horror movies of the 1930s and '40s had their star attractions, it was the supporting players who delivered some of the best performances of the Golden and Silver Age of Horror. Steven Thornton examines some of the standout performances during those periods.

THE HORROR FILM CRISIS OF 1932 by Gary D. Rhodes. With his "everything but the kitchen sink" approach, Gary looks at the year 1932, when horror movies almost met an early demise. Part one of his two-part article looks at what was happening in Hollywood during the first half of 1932 in regard to horror film production.

CLIFFHANGING HORRORS CHAPTER TWO by Todd M. Gault. In the second installment of his three-part article, entitled "Axis Zombies," Todd explores the serials of the 1940s, whose themes include a touch of horror and sci-fi.

All this, plus editorial comments, letters, film reviews, book reviews, and tons of photos. Published Summer 2003.

MFTV #17 CONTENTS (SOLD OUT!):

HATED, BLASPHEMED AND CONDEMNED by Richard Scrivani. Richard's article looks at the much-maligned 1939 film Son of Frankenstein, which features Boris Karloff in his final performance as the Frankenstein Monster.

"LISTEN TO THEM, MORGAN AND STROMBERG---WHAT MUSIC THEY MAKE!" by Richard Scrivani. Rich talks with Marco Polo's dynamic duo, John W. Morgan and William T. Stromberg, about their fabulous re-creations of some of the greatest horror scores of the 1930s and '40s.

ALMOST MARRIED, DIVORCED FROM HISTORY by Gary D. Rhodes. Gary uncovers a horror film from Fox Studios that has received almost no attention in the past---Almost Married, with Ralph Bellamy. It's a particularly strong horror film, with its obscurity caused almost certainly by the film's title and lack of existing prints.

THE HORROR FILM CRISIS OF 1932 PART II by Gary D. Rhodes. With his "everything but the kitchen sink" approach, Gary completes his look at the year 1932, when horror movies almost met an early demise. Part two of his article looks at what was happening in Hollywood during the second half of 1932 in regard to horror film production.

CLIFFHANGING HORRORS---THE FINAL CHAPTER by Todd M. Gault. In the final installment of his three-part article, entitled "Purple Monster Redux," Todd explores the serials of the 1950s, whose themes include a touch of horror and sci-fi.

All this, plus editorial comments, letters, film reviews, book reviews, and tons of photos. Published Fall 2003.

MFTV #18 CONTENTS (SOLD OUT!):

KONGVERSATIONS: PART ONE by Bob Burns (As Told to Tom Weaver). In part one of "Kongversations," Bob remembers his 1956 encounter with Willis O'Brien. Bob visited him at his home and had the good fortune to watch him while he was stop-motion-animating a scene for his next picture, The Black Scorpion.

QUERYIN' MERIAN by Tom Weaver. Tom provides us with a transcription of a rare audiotape that Bob Burns received when he and approximately 40 other people attended a special screening of King Kong at the house of cinephile Bob Forbes in 1964. Merian C. Cooper was the guest of honor at the screening.

CAT PEOPLE AND THE ORIGINS OF THE LEWTON STYLE by Michael H. Price. Renowned film scribe Michael H. Price looks at Val Lewton's horror films for RKO in the 1940s and the influence they had on other horror films during that decade and for years to come.

SACRIFICE PLAYS: THE WICKER MAN AND EYE OF THE DEVIL by Brian Smith. Brian compares two films with a similar theme---ritual offerings by small villages (in the form of human sacrifices) to the ancient gods to ensure a good harvest.

FOREST PRIME-EVIL by Mark Clark. Mark looks at the three creators of Image Comics' new "Monster Rally" graphic novel, THE BLACK FOREST, and the creative process behind it.

All this, plus editorial comments, letters, film reviews, book reviews, and tons of photos. Published Summer 2004.

MFTV #19 CONTENTS (SOLD OUT!):

KONGVERSATIONS: PART TWO by Bob Burns (As Told to Tom Weaver). In Part Two of "Kongversations," Bob remembers his 1963 encounter with Marcel Delgado. Bob visited him at his home and got to hear stories about the projects that he had worked on and the people he had known.

MERIAN C. COOPER & FAY WRAY SPEAK OUT ON KING KONG by Tom Weaver (From the Bob Burns Archives). Tom provides us with a transcription of a 1965 TV appearance by King Kong writer-producer-director Merian C. Cooper and star Fay Wray on the local Los Angeles KHJ-TV (Channel 9) show Nine on the Line, arranged to ballyhoo an upcoming KHJ showing of Kong.

A VERY LONELY SOUL: A TRIBUTE TO HELEN CHANDLER by Greg Mank and Gary D. Rhodes. Renowned film scribe Greg Mank talks with Geraldine ("Gerry") Chandler, Helen's sister-in-law, more of a kid sister than an in-law. She shared many happy times with Helen, remaining devoted, almost 40 years after Helen's death, to her memory.

POE ONLY CONCEIVED IT: KARLOFF & LUGOSI AT UNIVERSAL, 1934-35 by Frank Dello Stritto. In an extract from his new book, A QUAINT & CURIOUS VOLUME OF FORGOTTEN LORE: The Mythology & History of Classic Horror Films, Frank looks at the films Karloff and Lugosi made at Universal in 1934-35.

WHAT IF?---OR, WHY 1926 MIGHT HAVE BEEN A MUCH BETTER YEAR by Gary D. Rhodes. Gary gives us a peek at what might have been if Lon Chaney had starred in a proposed MGM version of Mary Shelley's FRANKENSTEIN in 1926.

SVEN-GARLIC! by Tom Weaver. Tom talks to producer Richard Gordon on actor Robert Newton's casting and eventual replacement in the 1955 film version of Svengali.

All this, plus editorial comments, letters, film reviews, book reviews, and tons of photos. Published Winter 2004.

MFTV #20 CONTENTS (SOLD OUT!):

APPRECIATION LIONEL ATWILL1885-1946 by Greg Mank. Author Greg Mank provides us a brief overview of the actor's life and career. Mank provided a much more in-depth look at Atwill (along with Colin Clive and George Zucco) in his 1998 book, Hollywood's Maddest Doctors, published by Midnight Marquee Press.

THE MYSTERY OF LIONEL ATWILL: An Interview with the Son of the Late Great Horror Star by Greg Mank. Greg Mank interviews the infamous actor's son for the first time in print. The article is illustrated with many rare and never-before-published family photos. Included is a transcription of a brief 1933 interview of Atwill published in the Los Angeles Evening Herald Express.

THE PANTHER WOMEN OF ISLAND OF LOST SOULS by Gary D. Rhodes. Author Gary Rhodes looks at the contest Paramount Studios conducted in 1932 to cast the part of the Panther Woman in their 1933 classic, Island of Lost Souls. In the end, more than 60,000 contestants entered the contest.

ISLAND OF LOST SOULS MANIMAL GALLERY (Photographs Courtesy of the Springer Collection/Photofest/Tom Weaver). Continuing with the Island of Lost Souls theme, check out these great close-ups (many of which have never been published before) of some of Dr. Moreau's Manimals from the 1933 film.

JUSTICE...LOST IN SPACE? by Tom Weaver. Ib Melchior, the 1950s and '60s writer/director (The Angry Red Planet, Reptilicus, Journey to the Seventh Planet, Planet of the Vampires, etc.), talks with Tom Weaver about creating the 1960s TV series Lost in Space, only to get screwed over'by Irwin Allen.

STARRING BORIS KARLOFF AND CHRISTOPHER LEE: The Duo's Chilling Double Feature by Mark A. Miller and Tom Johnson (Excerpt from their book, The Christopher Lee Filmography). Mark and Tom look at the production history of the Boris Karloff and Christopher Lee “Chillers” Corridors of Blood and The Crimson Cult.

All this, plus editorial comments, letters, film reviews, book reviews, and tons of photos. Published Summer 2005.


MFTV #21 CONTENTS ($9.00):

WHITHER SAUCER-MEN?: Many of AIP's (and Paul Blaisdell's) Classic Creatures Remain MIA on DVD by Mark Clark. Mark Clark looks at classic AIP films (many featuring monsters created by Paul Blaisdell) that have yet to surface on DVD in the United States. Also, Tom Weaver shares the late Herbert Strock's honest reactions when he recently re-watched Blood of Dracula for the first time in years.

LON CHANEY GOES ALBU-QUIRKY!: Lon Chaney, Jr. Returns to the Stage---And Meets His Match in a Beautiful Blonde Newcomer! by Tom Weaver. Longtime MFTV contributor Tom Weaver talks with actress Barbara Knudson about the hazards of costarring with Lon Chaney, Jr. in a 1950 stage production of Born Yesterday.

UNIVERSAL WEEKLY: House Organ of Horror Part I by Gary D. Rhodes and Galen Wilkes. Author Gary Rhodes (assisted by Galen Wilkes) examines Universal Weekly, the official house trade publication of Universal Studios in the early 1930s. The article offers both images and words from the forgotten publication, which promoted most of the key horror films of the time with anecdotes and pictures that haven't been seen/heard since.

ECONOMY OF BUDGET, ECONOMY OF SCALE: The Golden Age of Made-for-TV Terrors by Bryan Senn. Bryan Senn reminisces about his favorite made-for-television movies of the 1970s, including Don't Be Afraid of the Dark, The Night Stalker, Trilogy of Terror, and Gargoyles. Included is a brief Tom Weaver interview with Don't Be Afraid of the Dark writer, Nigel McKeand.

I MARRIED A MONSTER FROM OUTER SPACE: An Appreciation by John Rozum. Scooby Doo comic book writer John Rozum provides a detailed analysis of one of his favorite films, 1958's I Married a Monster from Outer Space

THE PINNACLE OF PRICE: The Horror Legend Achieved New Heights in Four Remarable Films by Mark Clark. Four of Vincent Price's best film performances (Tales of Terror, The Masque of the Red Death, Conqueror Worm, and The Abominable Dr. Phibes) are examined in this excerpt from Mark's book, Smirk, Sneer and Scream.

FILMS FROM THE VAULT: DVD & CD Reviews by Mark Clark, Marian Owens Clatterbaugh, and Gary L. Prange. Films reviewed are Monster Kid Home Movies, Flip: A Short Film, The Bela Lugosi Collection, The Hammer Horror Series, and The Call of Cthulhu (DVD & Soundtrack CD).

BOOKS FROM THE VAULT: Reviews by Mark Clark and David Colton. Books reviewed areThe Famous Monster Movie Art of Basil Gogos and Earth vs. The Sci-Fi Filmmakers: Twenty Interviews.

All this, plus editorial comments, letters, and tons of photos. Published Winter 2006.

MFTV #22 CONTENTS (SOLD OUT!):

BELA LUGOSI AS FRANKENSTEIN'S MONSTER: The Context and Text of a Performance by Scott Berman. MFTV's newest scribe, Scott Berman, spotlights Bela Lugosi's much maligned performance in 1943's Frankenstein Meets the Wolf Man.

LUGOSI AND KARLOFF IN 1939 by Greg Mank. Longtime MFTV scribe Greg Mank spotlights the careers of Bela Lugosi and Boris Karloff in 1939, between the filming of Son of Frankenstein and Black Friday. This article is an excerpt from Bela LUGOSI and KARLOFF (Greg's expanded and updated version of his 1990 book Karloff and Lugosi: A Haunting Collaboration).

UNIVERSAL WEEKLY: House Organ of Horror Part II by Gary D. Rhodes and Galen Wilkes. Author Gary Rhodes (assisted by Galen Wilkes) completes his examination of Universal Weekly, the official house trade publication of Universal Studios in the 1930s. The article offers anecdotes and pictures from the forgotten publication, which promoted most of the key horror films of the time.

APE FIENDS OF THE SILENT ERA, PART I by Gary L. Prange. In the mid-1920s, apes were everywhere. Evolution was still debated in science academies, in the courtroom, and in the nation's newspapers. In an abridged chapter from his upcoming book, Symphony of Horror: How the Horror Film Came to Be, Gary looks at some of the earliest films that featured apes and humans with ape-like features as vicious killers.

WAY OF THE THEME KILLER by Brian Smith. Brian explores the world of the "Theme Killer" in his look at some of the cinema's most creative killers. Among the films discussed are And Then There Were None, The Brighton Strangler, Theater of Blood, The Abominable Dr. Phibes, and Dr. Phibes Rises Again.

FILMS FROM THE VAULT: DVD Reviews by Mark Clark. Reviews of The King Kong Collection, The Val Lewton Horror Collection, The War of the Worlds: Special Collector's Edition, The Flesh Eaters, The Horror of Party Beach, and The Curse of the Living Corpse.

BOOKS FROM THE VAULT: Reviews by David Colton and Bruce Dettman. Books reviewed are The Films of Fay Wray, King Kong Cometh! The Evolution of the Great Ape, and Beating the Devil: The Making of Night of the Demon.

All this, plus editorial comments, letters, and tons of photos. Published Summer 2006.

MFTV #23 CONTENTS ($9.00):

THE IMHOTEP OF RED ROCK CANYON: Locations of the Golden Age by Richard J. Schmidt. MFTV's newest scribe, Richard J. Schmidt, takes us on a tour of California's Red Rock Canyon where many films were shot during Hollywood's Golden Age (mainly of interest to our readers, The Mummy).

PERSONAL APPEARANCES OF KARLOFF AND LUGOSI by Greg Mank. Longtime MFTV scribe Greg Mank looks at the personal appearances Karloff and Lugosi made together including "The Black Cats Parade," "The Film Stars Frolic," and "The Gambol of Stars."

AN INTERVIEW WITH GEORGE R. SNELL by Gary D. Rhodes. Author Gary Rhodes talks with director George R. Snell about his stage productions of Arsenic and Old Lace and Dracula which featured Bela Lugosi as his leading man.

TREASURES FROM A MONSTER CLUB: The Old Dark Clubhouse and the Monster Premiums of Monster Bash by Richard Olson and Angie Olson. Richard and daughter Angie look at the Premiums (a tradition begun in 1998) given out at Monster Bash over the years. The creativity, inventiveness, and complexity of these fantasy items is astounding! (The interior front and pack covers feature a collage of the items.)

APE FIENDS OF THE SILENT ERA, PART II by Gary L. Prange. In the mid-1920s, apes were everywhere. Evolution was still debated in science academies, in the courtroom, and in the nation's newspapers. In the conclusion of his article (an abridged chapter from his upcoming book, Symphony of Horror: How the Horror Film Came to Be), Gary his looks at two of the earliest films (The Gorilla and The Wizard) that featured apes and humans with ape-like features as vicious killers.

GEORGE BARROWS, GORILLA GUY! by Bob Burns (As Told to Tom Weaver). Bob and Tom return to the pages of MFTV with an article on George Barrows (one of the original gorilla guys). Bob had the good fortune to see Barrows' gorilla suit (possibly the only suit belonging to an original gorilla guy that's left) at the Natural History Museum in Los Angeles and included are many photos from the visit. Bob was also a personal friend of George and appeared with him on an episode of The Lucy Show.

FILMS FROM THE VAULT: DVD Reviews by Mark Clark. Reviews of Hollywood Legends of Horror Collection, Inner Sanctum Mysteries: The Complete Movie Collection, The Boris Karloff Collection, and Icons of Horror Collection: Boris Karloff.

BOOKS FROM THE VAULT: Reviews by David Colton, Gary L. Prange, Jim Nemeth and Bryan Senn. Books reviewed are Monsters: A Celebration of the Classics from Universal Studios, Kenneth Strickfaden: Dr. Frankenstein's Electrician, The Astounding B Monster, and Mexploitation Cinema: A Critical History of Mexican Vampire, Wrestler, Ape-Man and Similar Films, 1957-1977.

All this, plus editorial comments, letters, and tons of photos. Published Spring 2007.

MFTV #24 CONTENTS ($9.00):

MEXICAN MONSTERS INVADE AMERICA! Fans Rejoice! by Bryan Senn. Bryan goes south of the border to look at some of Mexico's best loved horror films of the 1950s and '60s recently released by CasaNegra Entertainment on DVD.

EL VAMPIRO SPEAKS! An Interview with Mexican Horror Star German Robles by Bryan Senn, Richard Sheffield, and Jim Clatterbaugh. Monsters from the Vault caught up with Mexican horror star German Robles at Monster Bash and talked with him about his career and what keeps "El Vampiro" busy today.

SPECIAL EFFECTS WIZARD JOHN P. FULTON by Joanne Fulton Schaefer (As Told to Tom Weaver). Universal Studios' special effects wizard John P. Fulton is remembered by daughter Joanne and longtime contributor Tom Weaver. The article features many rare photos from Fulton's personal scrapbook.

CHANEY TALKS! A Tantalizing Glimpse at What Might Have Been by Scott Berman. Lon Chaney's two Unholy Three films are examined in detail by Scott, and he ponders what might have been had Chaney's career continued into the early days of the talkies.

SUMISHTA BRAHM REMEMBERS HER FATHER, JOHN BRAHM by Marty Baumann. First-time contributor Marty Baumann (The Astounding B Monster) interviews Sumishta Brahm, daughter of renowned cult-film director John Brahm, whose credits include The Lodger, Hangover Square, The Undying Monster, Alfred Hitchcock Presents, Thriller, and The Outer Limits.

FILMS FROM THE VAULT: DVD Reviews by Mark Clark. Reviews of The Classic Sci-Fi Ultimate Collection, The Classic Sci-Fi Ultimate Collection, Volume 2, and Universal Horror Classic Movie Archive.

BOOKS FROM THE VAULT: Reviews by Steve Kronenberg. Books reviewed are Bela Lugosi: Dreams and Nightmares by Gary D. Rhodes with Richard Sheffield, and Good Night, Whatever You Are: My Journey with Zacherley, the Cool Ghoul by Richard Scrivani.

All this, plus editorial comments, letters, and tons of photos. Published Winter 2008.

MFTV #25 CONTENTS (SOLD OUT!):

HENRY HULL: From Werewolf to Edgar Allan Poe by Cortlandt Hull. Cortlandt Hull discusses his great-uncle's roles (and makeups) in the 1935 film WereWolf of London and the 1936 Broadway play Plumes in the Dust (in which he played Edgar Allan Poe).

THE CURSE OF THE CURSE OF THE CAT PEOPLE: A Production Diary by Greg Mank. MFTV regular Greg Mank provides a detailed look at the troubled (nine days over schedule and $60,000+ over budget) Val Lewton production The Curse of the Cat People.

SPECIAL DISPATCH FROM ED MALONE! David Hedison Reports on The Lost World by Mark F. Berry. First-time contributor Mark F. Berry (author, The Dinosaur Filmography) interviews David Hedison about working with Irwin Allen and the making of Allen's 1960 film The Lost World.

MANLY P. HALL, DRACULA, AND THE COMPLEXITIES OF THE CLASSIC HORROR FILM SEQUEL by Gary D. Rhodes. Everyone knows the sequel to 1931's Dracula was missing one thing---Dracula! Gary Rhodes provides proof that if Bela Lugosi and Manly P. Hall had had their way, that wouldn't have been the case.

UNIVERSAL HORRORS: An Interview with Authors Tom Weaver, John Brunas, and Michael Brunas by John Clymer. Another first-time contributor, John Clymer, talks with the authors of the book Universal Horrors. First published in 1990 (and considered by many to be the "Bible" of Universal's classic horror output), the volume has been dusted off and spruced up for its second edition.

FILMS FROM THE VAULT: DVD Reviews by Mark Clark. DVDs reviewed are Icons of Horror Collection: Sam Katzman, Cult Camp Classics: Volume 1 - Sci-Fi Thrillers, Fox Horror Classics, The Fly Collection, Witchfinder General, Return of Dracula/The Vampire, and Tales from the Crypt/The Vault of Horror.

BOOKS FROM THE VAULT: Reviews by Mark A. Miller, Mark Clark, Anthony Ambrogio, and Steve Kronenberg. Books reviewed are Mario Bava: All the Colors of the Dark by Tim Lucas, A Year of Fear: A Day-by-Day Guide to 366 Horror Films by Bryan Senn, The Dinosaur Filmography by Mark F. Berry, and Universal Horrors: The Studio's Classic Films, 1931-1946, Second Edition by Tom Weaver, Michael Brunas, and John Brunas.

All this, plus editorial comments, letters, and tons of photos. Published Summer 2008.

MFTV #26 CONTENTS ($9.00):

BORIS KARLOFF AT WARNER BROS. 1935-1939 by Greg Mank. For years, film history has basically smiled on the five star vehicles Karloff made for the brothers Warner. The Walking Dead is one of Karloff's most moving horror triumphs, and West of Shanghai, The Invisible Menace, Devil's Island, and British Intelligence---whatever their B picture eccentricities---all provide top billing showcases for the star's versatility. Yet coverage has never fully focused on what happened behind the scenes of Karloff's "Warners? Five," until now!

ONE BROWNING, TWO HELENS, AND A HOST OF FAKES: Narrative and Cinematic Trickery in The Thirteenth Chair (1929) by Gary D. Rhodes. Long-time MFTV contributor Gary Rhodes looks at the production of Tod Browning?s The Thirteenth Chair, a film that marks Tod Browning's shift away from his collaborations with Lon Chaney, Sr., and the beginning of his work with actor Bela Lugosi.

VAMPIRES, ZOMBIES, AND SORCERERS: The Best of Hammer Horror in the 1960s by Mark Clark and Bryan Senn. Mark and Bryan give us a sneak peek at their upcoming book, Sixties Shockers: Horror Films of the 1960s. This excerpt from the book looks at their choices of Hammer Studios' top three films (The Brides of Dracula, The Plague of the Zombies, and The Devil's Bride) from the decade.

UNIVERSAL-INTERNATIONAL?S THE STRANGE DOOR (1951): Part One by Tom Weaver and Steve Kronenberg. Tom and Steve share with Monsters from the Vault, The Strange Door chapter from their upcoming book, Universal Terrors: The 1950s (the long-awaited sequel to Universal Horrors). Part One looks at the inspiration, synopsis, and cast of the 1951 Universal-International film.

FILMS FROM THE VAULT: DVD Reviews by Mark Clark. DVDs reviewed are Fox Horror Classics Volume 2 (featuring Chandu the Magician, Dragonwyck, and Dr. Renault's Secret) and Icons of Horror: Hammer Films (featuring Scream of Fear, The Two Faces of Dr. Jekyll, The Curse of the Mummy?s Tomb, and The Gorgon).

BOOKS FROM THE VAULT: Book Reviews by Mark Clark and Bryan Senn. Books reviewed are I Talked with a Zombie: Interviews with 23 Veterans of Horror and Sci-Fi Films and Television by Tom Weaver and Creature Features: Nature Turned Nasty in the Movies by William Schoell.

All this, plus editorial comments, letters, and tons of photos. Published Spring 2009.


NEW SHIPPING RATES (EFFECTIVE JUNE 1, 2008)

Back issues are available for the single-issue price listed by each issue. Unfortunately, because of the high cost of shipping (and the recent USPS rate increase), I can no longer offer flat rate shipping on back issue orders. I found myself just today filling a back issue order (3 issues) for someone in Spokane, Washington, per my website they sent $5.00 for shipping but the actual cost was $9.00 via Priority Mail. While the previously listed shipping prices may have covered orders shipping to addresses on the East Coast, they definitely didn't cover shipping out West. Effective immediately the following procedures must be followed for all back issue orders: For single issue orders add $2.00 (the exception being our current issue, and preorders for our next issue, which will remain $11.00 each ($13.00 Canada), and the price includes First Class shipping). For all other orders click on the USPS Postage Rate Calculator (www.postcalc.usps.gov), then select "Package". Next, for every back issue ordered (2 or more) add one pound in the "Weight" box (if you order 2 issues, enter 2 pounds, if you order 3 issues, enter 3 pounds, if you order 4 issues, enter 4 pounds, etc.). Next in the "From ZIP Code" box put 21009, and in the "To ZIP Code" box put your ZIP code. Finally, hit "Continue" and multiple shipping rates will be displayed, ONLY, I repeat ONLY use the Priority Mail rate as ALL back issue orders ship via Priority Mail (no exceptions). If you send the amount for another type (such as Parcel Post, Bound Printed Matter, or Media Mail) your order will not be processed until I receive the correct amount. I'm sorry this has to be so complicated, but I can no longer continue to lose money filling orders, if I do so it will be the end of Monsters from the Vault! Foreign back-issue orders will be accepted, but shipping costs (via Air Mail only) must be determined before placing the order! Foreign readers contact me at editormftv@comcast.net with a list of back issues desired. Once the actual shipping costs have been determined, you will receive an e-mail from me with the total amount due. Once payment is received your issues will ship. Send check or money order in US dollars (payable to MONSTERS FROM THE VAULT) to:

MONSTERS FROM THE VAULT
P.O. BOX 981
ABINGDON, MD 21009-0981

Please allow 2-4 weeks for your order to be processed, shipped, and received. All single issue are shipped in Jiffy Rigi Bag cardboard mailers to prevent (or minimize) damage. I can no longer accept requests for additional cardboard as it pushes my shipping costs to Priority Mail which is now $4.80. Unfortunately, it's no longer feasible for me to do this. Multiple issue orders are shipped in a box.


Pay me securely with any major credit card through PayPal!


©1995-2012
MONSTERS FROM THE VAULT
P.O. Box 981
Abingdon, MD 21009-0981
410-569-1746
editormftv@comcast.net